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  1. Today
  2. CHESTNUTXE

    CLEVELAND ENGINE TALK

    I put oil pump ,timing chain,plate and just waiting for my bolt set Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk
  3. CHESTNUTXE

    CLEVELAND ENGINE TALK

    Heaps more parts came can at least put some on Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk
  4. Yesterday
  5. CHESTNUTXE

    CLEVELAND ENGINE TALK

    Yummy another set of well seasoned rockers and bolts from the scrapyard bargin price too Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk
  6. FORD_MAN

    Cleveland HEADERS - anyone used these?

    I've got oversized Proflow 1 7/8'' 3.5" stainless headers, PFE-EH4085S on my black XE ute, I've was looking to get a set of either them or the TriY version for my S-pak ute, they also have stainless xflow headers, Saw a mate got a set of their E series headers, I'll check them out next time I head over to his place.
  7. Mr Polson

    Long Term Engine Storage

    Pretty sure it's on the shelf at all Repcos. If not all, definitely the vast majority. https://www.repco.com.au/en/oils-fluids/greases-lubricants/lubricants/crc-heavy-film-soft-seal-300g/p/A7681836
  8. Last week
  9. SPArKy_Dave

    Long Term Engine Storage

    Buy some Soft-Seal from your local industrial suppliers, or even Repco/Bursons may stock it? The stuff I bought, is made by CRC. It's basically a non-drying wax/grease substance, in a spray can - designed specifically for rust protection, of metal machinery parts in storage.
  10. gerg

    Long Term Engine Storage

    Nah pretty much nailed it Bear. Myself.... I would loosely assemble it, coating everything in a mix of grease and canola oil, thin it down with turps and spray it on everything with a cheap pump pack from Bunnings. The turps evaporates, leaving behind the oily/greasy film. Assembling it keeps the bits protected inside, away from outside air. I had a virgin 4MA crank go completely rusty just sitting on the shed floor wrapped in an old oily shirt. It's so bad it will need a 0.010 cleanup minimum. I also had a shiny, freshly reco'd crossflow alloy head go completely fucked just sitting in my shed wrapped in the plastic it came in. I think my dog might have pissed on that but you get the gist of it. Engine parts rust bloody easily. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  11. bear351c

    Long Term Engine Storage

    If you're talking a year before touching anything, then grease the SHIT out of everything. Get your hands dirty, smear it all over the bores, wind the engine over and repeat. Same as with the head, block face, valves, rods, pushrods, bolts and any part that is machined/shiny. WD40 is crap, don't bother, as after winter all your metal will be rusty. This means that when you come to rebuild, you will need to wash everything down REALLY well, with thinners or Acetone, to remove all residue. But that's all part of learning, being able to touch, feel, handle all the mechanicals. Just my 12 cents worth. Others may disagree, but Such Is Life.
  12. JackFrost

    Long Term Engine Storage

    As a COVID project I got this Crossflow engine from a bloke that wanted to do an LS conversion for a ZL Fairlane to a skid car. Win-Win as he got some cash and I saved what looked like a good engine from scrap or getting blown-up. Disclaimer here, this is the first engine I have ever done anything with beyond changing the oil, spark plugs and coolant so I'm not going to pretend I know anything. The aim was to try and learn something new while tearing it down and confirm it was a decent engine for when I can get a shed built and relocate the XF S-Pack from over the border. The XF should be an 84DA block with OEM carby & intake (if it is still all original). The new engine will be an insurance policy as the plan will be to keep the XF as original as possible although reading through the posts here it looks like the 86DA & HF-7 head are improvements. I did forget to ask for the ECU. The dismantle went well and the only casualties were the water pump and ISC Valve. Removing the fan without the four bolts that secure the pulley was fun but I got there in the end. Internals looked pretty clean so I'm hoping that the majority of its life it was driven like a Fairlane not a skid car. The local shop where I get my Family Truckster serviced inspected the block and heads and said they are sound and good for a future rebuild if required. They got the pistons (0.040) off the rods for me and gave the sump, exhaust manifold and rocker cover a clean-up but left the block and head as is. Everything is home now and the block is back on the engine stand so my plan was to put the following components back together so that I can seal everything up on the stand and stop it deteriorating or anything getting lost / damaged: Sump Block Crank Cam Head Rocker Cover Timing Cover Exhaust Manifold Injector Rail Intake Manifold an Plenum Thermostat and Water Pump The following parts are now wrapped up and stored away in containers: Rods Flywheel Valves / Springs / Rockers / Pushrods / Tappets Distributor Oil Pump and pick-up Timing Chain and Sprocket Power Steering Alternator I'm chasing any advice I can get but the things that came to mind first were: Should I be putting all these components back together or keeping them apart, With new gaskets would I bolt it together at a bit less than full torque given I'm just storing not running, and Will a light coat of oil on the internals be enough or should I use assembly lube or grease if it is going to sit for a couple of years ahead of being stripped again for rebuild. Thanks
  13. Thom

    SINGLE RAIL GEARBOX INFO

    Gearshift is 30mm further back on an au box
  14. CHESTNUTXE

    CLEVELAND ENGINE TALK

    But only suits factory manifold Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk
  15. gregaust

    CLEVELAND ENGINE TALK

    , Oh cool .. I used to tap threads and screw in plugs . Never seen them come with plugs . Learn something new
  16. deankdx

    SINGLE RAIL GEARBOX INFO

    also the gear stick position of the AU T5 is further back from what i was told.. need to verify that. but just another potential pain in the ass
  17. Thom

    SINGLE RAIL GEARBOX INFO

    Unleaded xflow and t5 xflow bellhousing are the same casting with the mounting holes drilled to suit whichever box was being used, I had one that was drilled to suit both but I would bet someone had done that,not the factory
  18. bear351c

    Crankshaft Inspection and Machining 101

    Very good info.
  19. Mixalis

    SINGLE RAIL GEARBOX INFO

    Damn... Well i have a mate measuring up an XF bellhousing 250-T5 now so ill know if you're lying, and ill let everyone know as well I swear i will
  20. gerg

    SINGLE RAIL GEARBOX INFO

    You are correct grasshopper. AU onwards I believe used the Mustang T5 input and bellhousing depth, which is 5/8” longer. You could possibly use a spacer between the box and the bellhousing to correct this but that throws your tailshaft length and shifter position out. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  21. Mixalis

    SINGLE RAIL GEARBOX INFO

    Greg you're a legend as usual. Unfortunately not the answer i was hoping for . Going by the above is it fair to say that the input shaft on an AU T5 is in fact longer than the input shaft on any other T5/single rail in early for 6's? In other words, is the 250 crossflow T5 bell housing (suit XF) the same depth as 250 crossflow single rail, and in turn shallower than the AU T5 bell housing?
  22. gerg

    SINGLE RAIL GEARBOX INFO

    T5 and Single Rail share same length, spline count and pilot bearing on all Ford 6s up to EL. I can go measure a spare box I have in a bit Ok shaft is 165mm from very tip (pilot section) to gearbox face (not input retainer) Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  23. Mixalis

    SINGLE RAIL GEARBOX INFO

    Hi guys reviving this thread. Does anyone happen to have the measurement for the length of a single rail input shaft (cortina if it makes any difference?) Mainly after the length between the tip of the input shaft to the face of the transmission case. Further to that, do we know if the measurement above is exactly the same as what is found in the T5? Thank you in advance
  24. CHESTNUTXE

    CLEVELAND ENGINE TALK

    Will do now actually,more stuff came too but my bottom end assembly no[emoji848] Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk
  25. deankdx

    Micrometer Tech

    dab of weld and grind it flush should fix it
  26. bear351c

    CLEVELAND ENGINE TALK

    Yep, I always cut all the holes out, just leaving a big square. Good tip.
  27. bear351c

    Micrometer Tech

    So, I have to stop using mine for a mini G-clamp, then..?
  28. SPArKy_Dave

    Micrometer Tech

    By Lyle Haley on Mar 1, 2019 Tenths Are Not For Camping I was told a few times that “tenths are for camping” when I was “chasing tenths” in my early machining career. We had micrometers with “tenths” reading on their spindles but the tolerances we had for our “vintage” engines allowed us to be fairly sloppy and still produce what was considered a quality product. Keep in mind though; this was the era when we all walked the 5 miles to school uphill both ways. There is a big difference in newer engines – today, we can expect engine life of 300,000 miles or more. Early failures in most modern engines can probably be avoided with good maintenance practices. But working on a precisely built modern engine requires measuring in “tenths” as mandatory. Since measuring in tenths is now a way of life, let’s take a look at your measuring equipment. You must consider that even with the best of care, micrometers, dial indicators, etc. can wear and become inaccurate. Just occasionally checking your outside micrometers with the reference standard that comes with them is not nearly enough to ensure the accuracy you need. Whether you are using a micrometer for setting dial bore gauges, inside micrometers or snap gauges, you are relying on the micrometer’s accuracy for the size. For example, when you use an outside micrometer to set a dial bore gauge, the bore gauge is used as a “comparator” to establish a tolerance. The exception to this is when some type of calibrated setting fixture is used instead of a micrometer to set a bore gauge. Since outside micrometers are usually what most shops rely on for an accurate dimension, let’s focus on their use and care. Regardless of the brand or type of micrometers you have, how often do you check them for accuracy with the reference standards that are usually supplied with them? Keep in mind that using your supplied standards is not considered “calibrating” your micrometer. You are just confirming that, by using the standard made for it, the micrometer is accurate at that size. How accurate it is for the rest of the one-inch travel of the barrel should be confirmed by using gauge blocks. There are lots of published technical papers out there telling you how critical your calibration procedures are. One of my favorites is a paper titled “Calibration Guidelines for Micrometers Using a Five-Point Calibration Method.” Under these guidelines a micrometer that is sent to a qualified calibration lab is first checked for obvious damage and that the barrel runs the full length freely. The condition of the spindle and anvil faces are checked, and any wear of the threads in the barrel is recorded. To check for thread and barrel wear, traceable gauge blocks are used to measure five different sizes. An example of the micrometer being checked with gauge blocks would be a -0.997˝, +0.611˝, 0.502˝, 0.246˝ and 0.128˝. The different sizes mean that the barrel of the micrometer will be stopped in a different position for each measurement. Any error more than +/- 0.00005˝ would show there is wear on the internal threads of the micrometer. These are not the only dimensions used for calibrating micrometers – most any combination will work as long as you are certain they are accurate and consistent. Gauge blocks must have a certificate of traceability from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). This means that they can be used to meet the 4:1 rule of calibration, the common rule of thumb first published in 1960. Gauge blocks are considered the highest in the hierarchy of precision – the accuracy of a gauge block is typically +/- 0.000002˝ and the accuracy of a micrometer is typically +/-0.0003˝. This difference exceeds the 4:1 ratio. The other area to be checked is the flatness and parallelism of the face of micrometers. You’ll never even notice it by looking but wear on the face of a micrometer from normal use can cause the face not to be flat. Physical damage, like dropping a micrometer, can cause the faces not to be parallel. Accurately checking the flatness and parallelism is done using an optical flat or optical parallel and a monochromatic light. The optical flat is a specially ground piece of glass that shows errors by using light bars reflecting off the faces of the micrometer. This picture shows a micrometer face being measured with an optical flat using a monochromatic light source. The space between the light bars is approximately 12 millionths of an inch. The straightness of the lines indicates that the surface is virtually flat. A simpler way for checking flatness is to use a ball or the sphere from a CNC probe. Accuracy matters – the heat from your hands can cause the metal sphere to grow enough that it will give erroneous readings. I have had success determining if a micrometer face is flat by using a tenth reading dial bore gauge. Carefully moving the contact point around the micrometer faces can show if it is dished out from normal wear. Even companies that have a dedicated gauge department will usually have an outside lab periodically certify their instruments. The cost of traceable gauge blocks, optical flats, the monochromatic lighting and a temperature-controlled room can be significant. But when you add the training and competence of people doing the checking you can see that it takes a very large company to justify a complete in-house lab. How a shop keeps track of the condition of their measuring equipment depends on many factors, and paying attention to the accuracy of your equipment is paramount to producing a quality product. However, when you add in the human element to doing precision measuring, you should realize you have another variable to work with. An outside micrometer can be used very accurately to get a dimension, but it can also be used as a crutch to confirm a dimension the machinist wants to see. Not only do you need to check the accuracy of the micrometer but that of the user as well. One method of checking the accuracy of employees using micrometers is to put a piece of tape over the dimension of a gauge block, then have everyone who uses micrometers measure the gauge block and record what they see for size. Once again, care must be used when doing this as just the heat from handling a gauge block can change its dimension. To be more practical, in an average shop you could use a freshly ground and polished crankshaft for checking. When outside micrometers are calibrated by labs they use the spring-loaded ratchet on the micrometer to get equal pressure on the part. Whether I am right or wrong I have a problem measuring a round surface like a crank journal using a ratchet on the micrometer. Establishing the “feel” of the micrometer passing over a journal is critical to getting a consistent, accurate measurement. However you do it, getting all micrometer operators to not only understand the importance of consistency but also the importance of understanding the consistency of size can be an obvious benefit for producing a consistent product.
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