thorne

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thorne last won the day on January 13

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About thorne

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  1. I'd prefer this panelvan: white XG with XR lights, XH clip and wing-mirrors, SVO mags. $8000 might be a bit much though.... https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/XG-falcon-panel-van/273605186061?_trkparms=aid%3D777003%26algo%3DDISCL.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20140117125611%26meid%3D76bcda19f3534f2c9c07e47bbb1ba3a0%26pid%3D100009%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D10%26sd%3D273606967055%26itm%3D273605186061&_trksid=p2047675.c100009.m1982
  2. Ford Falcon XE 351 panelvan, looks absolutely mint, but.....$34,000?! https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Ford-xe-spack-panelvan-351-t5-9inch-swaps/302988497766?_trkparms=aid%3D333200%26algo%3DCOMP.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20180228161002%26meid%3D4ddedf11a8784110aa972ce381e0adab%26pid%3D100008%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D12%26sd%3D223263514315%26itm%3D302988497766&_trksid=p2047675.c100008.m2219
  3. My XH has the fuel selector switch in the binnacle as well, but maybe that's because mine's the model after they made the change...? Otherwise this ute looks to be in great condition, even with the respray. Best of luck with the resto, looking forward to seeing this on the road. Another ute! We welcome you to the cult of the Ford Commercial vehicle.
  4. New accessories arrived for the Lady while I was overseas! This weekend is the only time I've had to myself since I cam back earlier this week. Firstly the boot scuff-protector over the rear bumper: Next, the boot cargo-net: And both together: The cargo net will be bloody useful, as I won't need to put the shopping in the front passenger's footwell.....at least if I remember to stop parking arse-first into my parking spot.
  5. Well, while I didn't see any Ford Rancheros while I was over there (which I was secretly keeping an eye out for), I did spot a couple of old friends when I was on holidays in southern Africa over the last month.... A Fairmont AU in Springbok, Northern Cape province, South Africa (notice the mismatched tail-lights). A Cortina in the just-as-boldly-coloured buildings of Bo-Kaap, upper Cape Town, Western Cape province, South Africa. I even hired a car while staying in Cape Town (a VW Polo) to drive down to the Cape Peninsula and the Cape of Good Hope; while South Africa drives on the same side of the road as Australia, traffic over there is fucking insane! I survived it somehow.
  6. Looks good: I haven't used Reolink before but I haven't heard anything about them (which is actually a thumbs-up in IT, as bad news travels fairly quickly). I actually use two Synology server-style NAS systems at work (comprising of a total of 8 HDDs over 2 16TB arrays, hooked into about 40 cameras, mostly lower-spec D-Link cameras, the majority of them transmitting over wi-fi), and the camera you're looking at seems reasonably priced considering all it can do. Synology's Surveillance Station is one of the more popular camera programs, which can either ride on default camera output or even co-opt control of it completely (such as using Surveillance Station to program sentry or patrol patterns, moving the camera between two programmed points, activate on motion detection, reboot itself at particular times, etc). This model - like many - can even record to SD card if there's no network around, and power over ethernet (PoE) really simplifies cabling, so long as the switch is PoE-compliant. Your setup sounds pretty awesome otherwise, like your work.
  7. Might also be worthwhile thinking about how you review footage and where you store it. If you have multiple cameras recording with audio and 4K resolution that you want at least 30 days' retention, then you'll need a unit with a decent amount of storage space; most units will have a HDD installed internally but you'll need to keep an eye on how big it is. Cameras can also transmit over private wi-fi into the unit - makes it easier cable-wise but each unit will still need mains power - but that will increase the price as the unit needs its own wi-fi transceiver. The cameras themselves can run the entire gamut of fixed black-and-white images over RCA cabling to the you-beaut PTZ (pan-tilt-zoom) infra-red 360deg weather-proof dome cameras with multiple microphones that transmit over network or wi-fi. It really comes down to image quality, resolution, and retention time, each increasing the price as you go. There's also the question of access: these days most units are networked and can connect directly to an internet router (either via cable or its own wi-fi), and configured correctly can be viewable externally over a smartphone app. This however has its own security issues: please ensure the firmware of every camera and the unit itself is updated regularly, as cheap or lazy units are incredibly easy to hack (Kogan and Swann CCTV systems are notorious for how insecure they are). Stand-alone units can be plugged into a monitor and mouse/keyboard for local viewing as well. Most systems are all-in-one (a fixed unit with HDD inside which cameras plug into/interface with), but there are some lightweight NAS units (network attached storage, basically a block of HDDs with an network address) that have built-in software (like Surveillance Station) specifically to talk to and administrate multiple cameras over a local network. Storage to a NAS also increases retention options and a NAS can automate a lot of the process, and even email you alerts. I used to be a cable guy before I side-stepped into IT, and security systems are my bread and butter; security footage audits and reviews are a part of my job. Let me know if you want any more details, I'd be happy to help.
  8. I use a futon in mine, which is light enough to wedge itself around the wheel arches, and plenty of space for storage (Esky, toolboxes, etc) furter along. I have plenty of insulating rubber between the tray and the futon (I had that custom-cut by Clark's Rubber for my old XF panelvan years ago), so when I lie on it I don't feel the tray underneath me. It's comfy enough for me for a decent kip.
  9. Ah, here it is: on the Car Club permits page of VicRoads' website, under the "Driving on a club permit" section: Towing a vehicle with a club permit Vehicles being driven on a club permit may tow a trailer/caravan, providing it is registered, or operating on its own club permit or unregistered vehicle permit. All normal towing limits and restrictions apply (ie. Towing restrictions for P1 probationary licence holders or motorcycle licence holders within the first three years of holding the licence) Hope this helps.
  10. I'm sure I've seen gray-ghost travellers hauling a campervan behind their H-plated '70s Land Cruiser across country Victoria before. My panelvan will be up for club permit in three years (it's equipped with a towing brake and heavy-duty tow-bar) and I intend to tow with it.
  11. An extraordinary sighting in Yarra Glen over the weekend: By the past pic, it appears to be attracting other people's attention.... It looks incredible: while it appears to have had minimal modernisation (external blinkers installed front and rear), it's clearly in running condition. While the vanity plate on the front states it's a Model A, I'd've thought by its shaping it was actually a Model B.....? And on the way back, this raced past (at the intersection of Maroondah and Warburton Highways): Not entirely sure what it is, but it sure looks nice.....!
  12. It's that time of year again! So the Lady went in for a "major" service today....and what did they give me for a loan car.......? A pony! Sharp eyes would have noticed this is actually the 4-cylinder model: a bit of a let-down, but still surprisingly zippy nonetheless; I had fun in her! Admittedly the interior was a little cramped for someone as tall as I am, and the quality suffered from the right-hand drive conversion (hand-brake on the wrong side, wing-mirrors positioned incorrectly for right-hand drivers and their adjustment was difficult), space for only two adults in the rear seats, but it steered well, responded quickly to a bit of welly regardless, and had a kick-ass sound-system. This 4cyl model even had a 10-speed gear-box! Also came with a fully digital dash: Note the info on the engine's turbo (centre), and even vehicle-detection and lane-departure system (right), which rumbles the steering wheel if you change lanes without indicating (didn't give the emergency braking system a try!). Electronically, I was pretty impressed. Car came with keyless-go (push-button ignition, right of console....notice the old-skool switches across the bottom) and a Sync3 ICC. All up, not too bad: I wouldn't mind trying the 8-banger version sometime, but it was still a little cramped for my liking (too used to a family-sized Falcom I guess). At the end of the day I traded her back for the Lady, running a little quieter and having even been given a wash and looking classy again.
  13. I like the original darker gray 14" 12-slotters on my panelvan. I was seriously considering replacing them with shark-fin/FTR rims......but found myself liking the 12-slotters more. Maybe if I remove the bull-bar I'll switch to the FTRs, I don't think they'd suit a bull-bar somehow.
  14. Just finished watching The Hunt for Red October on SBS Viceland I love sub flicks (although in this case the book was superior), and far less ads on SBS.
  15. I remember seeing that Brougham.....hmm, lessee.... *counts on fingers* two factories ago. Hasn't changed much.