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gerg

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Everything posted by gerg

  1. gerg

    Boingk's F250 4x4

    At least it will run on paint thinner Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  2. gerg

    Boingk's F250 4x4

    Great work, it will be snapped up throughout the interwebs for sure Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  3. gerg

    Boingk's F250 4x4

    That's a great photo of the scallops I mentioned, probably the best illustration of the differences Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  4. gerg

    Boingk's F250 4x4

    There are ways of telling if the heads are closed chamber 2Vs, it's to do with the scalloping along the front edge where the face meets the block. But if you're pulling it down, it's going to be pretty obvious, plus with a big "302" cast into the crank, you can end all speculation. In my humble opinion, going 302 won't save any fuel. Clevos just like a drink no matter how much you try and lean it out. The ports are too big on a 302 to have decent velocity for best fuel atomisation. It's odd that that carby is leaking. One of the best aspects of the Motorcraft/Holley/Summit design is that there are no gaskets below the fuel level except for acc pump. The power valve sits up underneath too, under a little plate similar to the acc pump. I reckon the leak is from a foam float that is no longer bouyant, (causing the float bowl to flood). I had this happen on mine and switched to nylon ones. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  5. gerg

    Boingk's F250 4x4

    Oops yeah forgot about that... That explains a lot then. Engine code for a 302 2v is "Y". Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  6. gerg

    Boingk's F250 4x4

    Yeah that was the Email Carter. My XB had that originally, dad reckoned that was the best out of the 3 carbies it had over the years, the others were a 2-barrel Holley (rubbish, caused 2 engine fires) and the Strommy WW (good carby for a 250) Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  7. gerg

    Boingk's F250 4x4

    Most early 351s were 2 barrel, only XA and early XB GT manuals were 4V, then there was a brief period when XBGT autos and late manuals got the rare Aussie 4-barrel Motorcraft carby intake with 2V ports. Then XC-XD-XE all got spreadbore ThermoQuads, regardless of 302 or 351 If it was a 2V 351, it would have a K-code on the build plate. Being a truck, I would say that's definitely the case. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  8. gerg

    Boingk's F250 4x4

    Nice! Purrs pretty sweet, but sounds like one bank of lifters is a bit lazy. The Cleveland Clack strikes again! Looks like a 2-barrel flat-top Holley, half of the 4bbl one I ran on mine for a while. They're an update on the Motorcraft 2100/4100 dating back to the 50s. Great carby, but the Holleys were a dead-end. Not as tuneable as the traditional ones. You can still buy them as the "Summit" carb, many swear by them. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  9. gerg

    Boingk's F250 4x4

    Factory chassis and engine numbers were often hand-stamped, so look dodgy even though they're legit. They only have to be legible when new, they don't care about 40 years down the track. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  10. gerg

    Pissing me off

    I wanna do this to my XB... but I think a Territory front end might be easier to adapt if it doesn't make it sit too high Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  11. gerg

    Decoding your F-truck VIN/Chassis no.

    Looking at the tag in your build thread, the last digit seems to be separate from the rest, like it's one too many. Maybe that's a variant on the model designation Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  12. About time Century brought it back here. They went to shit a few years ago with imported ones, we were getting 3 months out of some before they were sulfating up. Best run we had out of any battery was with SuperCharge, the ones made in the Phillipines with the ribbed casing. Some went for 8 years strong Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  13. gerg

    Electrical wiring diagram

    You could theoretically run it without one, just keep the battery connected to a 10 amp charger while it's running. Engine dyno rooms run in a similar way (as well as separate water pumps sometimes). You'll still need to drive your water pump somehow and the belt will need tensioning with something in place of the alternator. Might just be easier to run one. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  14. gerg

    Electrical wiring diagram

    On MSD boxes, sure I got one but without one, MSD dizzys can still run but need a module to run the coil. The usual Bosch module works but you need to mount it on some ally plate with some heatsink compound to shed the heat. Other than that, pretty simple, just like the factory Bosch setup. IGN switch to module +, also module + twinned off to coil, coil - back to coil - on the module, and the 2 dizzy trigger wires (MSD runs purple and orange vs whatever the Bosch ones are). The engine will run with them backwards but not as good. You'll find out which way they're supposed to go. Oil pressure light and temp gauge are optional and advisable. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  15. gerg

    New Ute

    I would be torn between the two to be honest. The XG looks better but the XH is mechanically superior in the front end (rack and pinion, E-series suspension). If there was a way of swapping the XG panels onto the XH, I would do that. I guess it comes down to either looks or driving feel. If you can make the XH look sweet, then I would go that way. 350k vs 300k ain't much in the scheme of things. They're pretty much the same from the windscreen back anyway. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  16. gerg

    WINDSOR SMALLBLOCK TALK

    The first Windsor blocks (221/260/289) can theoretically be stroked with the 2M crank from the 302 but the pistons will stick out the bottom of the bores slightly at BDC. Hardly worth worrying about that minor issue but also hardly worth bothering with as Thom said, pre-65 blocks are 5-bolt and rare as anyway. On the subject of the 255, they only made them for 2 miserable years in the 80s (I think 81-82) then they gave up on that dead-end. I think they were good for something like 120 HP. But GM were doing the same thing with the SBC so Ford can't cop too much flak from it. This short production run makes them extremely rare, and pretty much irrelevant now. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  17. gerg

    WINDSOR SMALLBLOCK TALK

    The 255 has a 3" stroke like the 302 but the crank is a lot lighter, the crank pins are semi-hollow and the counterweights are smaller. Racers in speedway stock classes used to hunt around wreckers for these cranks because they had a lower rotating mass. They could break more easily too but racing is about breaking stuff to win Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  18. gerg

    WINDSOR SMALLBLOCK TALK

    No better than a 289 in theory, both have same stroke. 221 has tiny pistons, sort of like what a 253 is to a 308 Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  19. gerg

    WINDSOR SMALLBLOCK TALK

    And will last a lot longer as a regular driver vs the usual 347 piston load/rod angle issues Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  20. gerg

    Power Steering Box INFO

    Thanks Dave, I think the differences in the castings and the taper in the holes are due to the respective manufacturing methods. I have a genuine Kirby-Bishop top here and it looks to have been die cast, judging by the parting lines. The pic you have there of the new version looks like it's been investment (lost wax mould) cast. Die cast needs a certain amount of taper on some parts to allow easy release from the dies. Investment casting is much more free in what shape it can be (unlimited, basically) Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  21. gerg

    CLEVELAND ENGINE TALK

    I think you'd put on it whatever the LS crowd uses on their conversions... Plenty of different turbos kicking around and yeah, I'd go reversed manifolds into a big single mounted on the passenger side (opposite the battery) to simplify plumbing. You could go underfloor but that has its own issues of drain back, etc and ground clearance on a Falcon would be a hassle. That would be a hoot but the cost will go way beyond just the conversion. Even with a conservative amount of boost, you'd be knocking on the door of 600hp. I reckon you'd pop the borgy diff, even if it is a 28-spline 4-pinion. I think a built 9" would have to happen. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  22. In my experience, the oil just gets that smell about it (to an extent), especially if doing short trips and in winter. This is due to the fuel not vapourising properly in the cold weather in a cold engine, causing the fuel to stick to the bores and wash down into the oil below the pistons. Carby cars run a bit richer and can go out of tune over time, so maybe the carby needs looking at. If you take it on a good high-speed run (I'm talking a few hundred km), the oil level might drop a bit. That's the fuel evaporating out of it (not the engine suddenly "using oil" as many seem to think). Best way to tell if the oil is being diluted excessively is to rub a bit between your fingers. If it feels slimy and smooth, then it's doing its job. If you can feel your fingerprints grinding as you rub them together, then the oil has thinned or broken down, and should be replaced. Yes mechanical fuel pumps can fail in the diaphragm and pump fuel into the sump, but this doesn't happen very often. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  23. gerg

    Cleveland lifters

    Forgot to add... Pissy oil capacity means hotter oil, which thins out and adds even more to the oil pressure problem. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  24. gerg

    Cleveland lifters

    Clevos onwards cheaped out with the oiling system. They ran the whole motor on 2 oil galleries that fed the left side of the lifters with one plus the mains and cam, the other crossing over and feeding the right lifter bank. 302 and 351Ws have 3, which by many accounts have been more than adequate. The problem is, the crank oiling requirements are actually greater with clevos, having 2.75" mains vs 2.25" for 302Ws, making the oil feed problem worse. The final contributor to this is that Clevos breathe well, meaning they like a rev. So crank journal surface speed is higher, rpm is higher, and oil is less plentiful. They also have a pissy sump capacity: 4.5 lites, meaning if a lot of oil gets to the top of the motor, the oil pump gets starved. Many modern 4 cylinders take as much oil as clevos used to. So they apparently spin #4 or 5 bearing when having a good go. There are ways of restricting the oil to one of the lifter galleries, which diverts more to the mains. It involves drilling and tapping a screw-in orifice up inside one of the oil feeds to the galleries. Another less-involved mod was to run an external line from the blanked-off oil port just near the fuel pump (oil comes straight out of the oil pump there) around to the oil pressure sender port at the back of the valley, to feed oil straight to the back of the motor. So... A Windsor bottom end would be better-oiled, lighter, smaller, have more parts readily available and be less costly, and if you get an earlier block, will be stronger in the bores than a Clevo. It's tempting to go and bolt on a set of Clevo heads but the reality is that there is a ridiculous amount of Windsor heads out there now that will flow and perform as good as a set of clevos for much less outlay, with all the other bolt-ons and valvetrain components being cheaper as well. Heads are also smaller and more compact than those on a Clevo. The boss heads would look tops, but you don't drive down the road with your head under the bonnet admiring your mad engine bits. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
  25. gerg

    Cleveland lifters

    I have experienced this exact failure in my 302C and that pressure variance (ie compression and no compression) is caused by the unevenly worn lifter rotating alternately to the high and low spots. When it hits the worn bit, the hydraulic plunger pumps up to take up the clearance. Then the lifter rotates around to the high spot and then is over-pumped, holding the valve open constantly. Hence no compression when that happens. I could hear this with my engine running; clack-clack-clack, then silence but missing on that cylinder. Then it bled back down, clack-clack again, and the cycle continues. Sent from my CPH1920 using Tapatalk
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