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macman

Project: Re-assembly!

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20 hours ago, 2redrovers said:

Looking good. Which way does the curve go? Put something either edge to support the straight edges, then with a rounded length of timber to push down in the middle. Gentle persuasion of a large hammer to bash on the timber may be needed.

 

It's the gentle curve as it wraps left to right under the windscreen which I'm struggling to achieve at the moment. Because the top edge ends up almost like a piece of angle, my last thought was cutting two V's along the top edge to allow it to curve slightly, then zapping them in place.

 

8 hours ago, dvfalcon said:

Great fab work! The fun of leaving the car idle and build up under the wiper grill. Did it rust under neath here. I was lucky(not) to find a silastic repair patch on mine that once removed had full view of the gear stick

Dale

 

Thanks! It isn't as neat as the photo makes it look, but it also wasn't as hard as I'd thought it was going to be either. With the wiper motor bracket/mount unpicked, there is a small pinhole in one spot, so I will need to remove the dashboard again (so not to set fire to anything) and put in a small patch. I've tried cleaning up pinholes and trying to zap them closed with the MIG but most of the time it just keeps blowing out as the surrounding metal is too thin. So I will cut out a small square and zap in a fresh square of metal.

 

A silastic repair patch in this area makes me cringe. No doubt works short-term but would only encourage more rust long term and I can smell the wet carpet already haha.

 

On 3/11/2019 at 3:09 PM, BGDAV said:

How did you make the circle inlay? Looks like dimple die 

 

So I cut a suitable size hole with a metal hole saw on the drill press, filed the hole clean/tidy then used a pair of pliers to start the flange, just bending it by hand. Once it was roughly done, I put it on this tool on my anvil and tappy tappy tappy until happy.

 

CRK21fb.jpg

 

Couple of other repairs I've done now. Sorry no progress shots or pics of the patches I made, just BEFORE and AFTERS so it's not much help for anyone wanting to follow my method, but it's progress...!

 

RH front sill edge had a bunch of pinholes. Tried to zap them closed and just kept blowing holes so cut the lot out and made some large-ish patches.

 

spsmN0N.jpg

 

Axdu63C.jpg

 

This rust hole behind where the washer bottle and overflow bottle was.

 

Inside engine bay:

YeKcMPV.jpg

 

Underside of same hole (shot from wheel arch):

sVzNZee.jpg

 

Didn't even try zapping this one up, too big and the metal was incredibly thin here. After wire-wheeling the area, I needed to cut a LOT out to reach clean metal... Was surprising!

 

From the engine bay (solid but not the neatest):

lBJcO2c.jpg

 

Shot from the wheel arch:

PyQsaQk.jpg

 

Last question for today - has anyone tried the Rare Spares boot rubber seal? Its not the same as the original, doesn't have the "flap" around the edge so am just wondering if it's any good?

baxIQ6O.png

 

Original:

2Wucv6e.png

 

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I think I get which way you mean.. Cut and weld will work but also look up tuck shrinking. Basically put a pucker or pleat in the metal with pliers or a tucking fork, then bash the metal down into itself preferably without overlapping itself.

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that anvil is awesome!

 

i kicked rust holes like that in a spare wagon door(only surface rust my ass) and my foot went through it.. so good to see you cutting out the affected area and patches look good too

 

Peter Tomassini has covered tuck shrinking before, makes a fork style plier to twist the metal into a pucker and then hammer the pucker flat.

 

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1 hour ago, 2redrovers said:

I think I get which way you mean.. Cut and weld will work but also look up tuck shrinking. Basically put a pucker or pleat in the metal with pliers or a tucking fork, then bash the metal down into itself preferably without overlapping itself.

 

Awesome, that looks like exactly what I need to learn how to do. Tuck shrinking (didn't even know it was a thing let alone how to do it). Will read up. Thanks!

 

51 minutes ago, deankdx said:

i kicked rust holes like that in a spare wagon door(only surface rust my ass) and my foot went through it.. so good to see you cutting out the affected area and patches look good too

 

Peter Tomassini has covered tuck shrinking before, makes a fork style plier to twist the metal into a pucker and then hammer the pucker flat

 

I didn't really have any understanding of how seriously a small rust hole can effect the metal around it. Better off cutting out a small hole and putting in a patch. I'm learning that. The metal really thins out around it!

 

30 minutes ago, BGDAV said:

thats a might fine anvil you have there 😮 

 

Thanks 😊 it is an amazing piece of equipment with a cool history. I used to use a piece of railway line (which was still useful) but this anvil is super. It's a 287lb (130KG) Peter Wright made early 1900's and came from Millar Bro's workshops in WA's south west. It rings like a bell and I love it.

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I've used ordinary pliers to do it before, trick there is to try not to crease the steel when you make the tuck. It can be helpful for beginners to clamp the part to the bench on either side of the tuck to hold it still and resist the metal trying to just flatten back out instead of actually shrinking.

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On 3/12/2019 at 6:45 PM, macman said:

 

It's the gentle curve as it wraps left to right under the windscreen which I'm struggling to achieve at the moment. Because the top edge ends up almost like a piece of angle, my last thought was cutting two V's along the top edge to allow it to curve slightly, then zapping them in place.

 

 

Thanks! It isn't as neat as the photo makes it look, but it also wasn't as hard as I'd thought it was going to be either. With the wiper motor bracket/mount unpicked, there is a small pinhole in one spot, so I will need to remove the dashboard again (so not to set fire to anything) and put in a small patch. I've tried cleaning up pinholes and trying to zap them closed with the MIG but most of the time it just keeps blowing out as the surrounding metal is too thin. So I will cut out a small square and zap in a fresh square of metal.

 

A silastic repair patch in this area makes me cringe. No doubt works short-term but would only encourage more rust long term and I can smell the wet carpet already haha.

 

 

So I cut a suitable size hole with a metal hole saw on the drill press, filed the hole clean/tidy then used a pair of pliers to start the flange, just bending it by hand. Once it was roughly done, I put it on this tool on my anvil and tappy tappy tappy until happy.

 

CRK21fb.jpg

 

Couple of other repairs I've done now. Sorry no progress shots or pics of the patches I made, just BEFORE and AFTERS so it's not much help for anyone wanting to follow my method, but it's progress...!

 

RH front sill edge had a bunch of pinholes. Tried to zap them closed and just kept blowing holes so cut the lot out and made some large-ish patches.

 

spsmN0N.jpg

 

Axdu63C.jpg

 

This rust hole behind where the washer bottle and overflow bottle was.

 

Inside engine bay:

YeKcMPV.jpg

 

Underside of same hole (shot from wheel arch):

sVzNZee.jpg

 

Didn't even try zapping this one up, too big and the metal was incredibly thin here. After wire-wheeling the area, I needed to cut a LOT out to reach clean metal... Was surprising!

 

From the engine bay (solid but not the neatest):

lBJcO2c.jpg

 

Shot from the wheel arch:

PyQsaQk.jpg

 

Last question for today - has anyone tried the Rare Spares boot rubber seal? Its not the same as the original, doesn't have the "flap" around the edge so am just wondering if it's any good?

baxIQ6O.png

 

Original:

2Wucv6e.png

 

Macman

Silastic was a major issue, most probably once the silastic repair was found would have scrapped this car. It is only a Fairmont Ghia, I didn’t want to travel around looking at cars that were not what people were saying where good. I had just cut, repaired and finished plenum surgery on the LHS. Water was slowly leaking into the car, the firewall insulation had acted like a sponge and were the it sits above the pedal box was destroyed. 

Looking back now with what I have learned in repairing I would take on any repair 

Dale

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Hey Dale, I just realised you're also following my build on the ESP forum, thanks for the comments both here and on there 👍

 

Do you have a link to your project at all?

 

On another subject, I've decided I'm going to give the Rare Spares boot rubber a go. Although it's not identical profile to original, it must still do the trick otherwise they wouldn't sell it... My rubber is pretty daggy.

 

Hoping to make some decent progress this weekend. Plan is to have this wiper motor mount FINISHED. Might be slightly optimistic...

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Unfortunately no build on a forum. One day I will put something up.Time poor that’s why it takes me so long, like to learn so do everything my self. I have shown different repairs of the plenum and Roof rust repairs I have done on both forums when people have asked question. Don’t mean to take over your tread here a a couple of what I dealt with.

 

hole filled with silastic

 

hF3VE5w.jpg

 

hole above pedal box

 

ptt2TXu.jpg

 

repaired a sealed

 

8GXrg2L.jpg

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No worries on the "take over" of the thread, it's all relevant and thanks for the pics! Woah that's some rust!! I'm so glad I don't have THAT to deal with! 

 

In your last pic - that patch you put in is exactly where I have a tiny pin hole (which I will be cutting out and putting in a patch too). I also note that you cut the EXACT area of the wiper motor mount as I did, but I suspect you did this for access to the rust hole below, right? Was your wiper motor mount rusted away too?

 

Last question, That grey coating you've used - how do you go about welding around it? Do you still need to grind back where you weld? Does the surrounding heat burn away the paint still?

 

I need to coat my repairs with something, but have two options:

 

1. coat before welding - better access not to miss spots but surely some contamination to the welds or having to strip back paint where you weld anyway?

2. coat after welding - means the metal is still clean/bright, but surely means more spots will be missed when it comes to painting/coating...?

 

Sorry for all the questions, anyone can feel free to chime in here.

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Wiper mount was of only cut back for access.

from memory this section behind wiper mount was 3 layer of sheet metal thick in section of of this repair I zinc every layer  and worked my way out the the grey paint ir Por15 once finished. If I was doing the layers again I would paint with copper weld through doenot burn off as much as the zinc

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Didn’t get as much done as I’d hoped I would today but with any luck I’ll get a few hours in tomorrow too.

Whipped the dashboard out again so I didn’t damage or set fire to anything then tried to zap up that pinhole, but it just blasted a bigger hole, as per usual. So I just cut out a small rectangle, made a repair patch and welded it in (easy).

Gave the whole area a cleanup with a wire wheel, used a Dremel to get the fiddly spots, then painted everything with some killrust silver.

b01086b36555c6145befa40fb56759cf.jpg

e1cfb5ddf1314462a0ca26c1497ea33e.jpg

881c0ab029b22199133929d939436f73.jpg

Hoping to get most of it welded up tomorrow, but I still have to knock up the angle section for directly under the windscreen so doesn’t look like I’ll get the whole lot finished, but mostly...



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doing really well with this car and the repairs. 

we were just talking about Dave's F100 today and there may be an area or 2 that will get reworked due to shit gasless welding repairs. 

wonder if you'll go back to any...(best welds are the last welds)

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Thanks heaps! Funny, I actually did think the exact same thing recently.

I considered potentially re-working some earlier welds but have decided my earlier ones (although a bit more messy) are still solid so I am thinking of leaving them.

I also considered potentially going back to my minor bog repairs and cutting/welding, but I’m also thinking they were all the more minor and non structural areas, so again I might be lazy and leave them too.

I don’t want to do a bodge job, but I also don’t want to get stuck going back over work that will probably be fine still. Well, that’s what I’ve decided for now. I have thought about this a fair bit recently...

Comes back to the fact that it won’t be getting a $$ paint job, the trim is good but not perfect, the engine and trans will be functional (hopefully) but not rebuilt. It will never be a full resto (in my ownership anyway). Can’t make a silk purse out of a sows ear, haha.


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I had the same thoughts with my f100 my earlier welds are shameful but should be fine - if rust comes back I will fix it then otherwise will be fine 

 

No high dollar pant job will be fine to leave - your early stuff is alot better then mine was 

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Sunday I drilled a series of 5mm holes in the repair sections, to "spot weld" and tack them into place, but I had a slow start and was about to pack up after a few attempts I wasn't getting any penetration between the two pieces and could just give it a twist and pull it off again.

 

My welds didn't seem to be penetrating through the hole and into the metal below, rather just neatly welding up the holes... Solution turned out to be 9mm holes instead which worked perfectly, such a contrast how easy it was with a larger hole and it's absolutely sold-as now.

 

I guess I was trying to make the spots too small and neat but next time I try this sort of method I'll just put in 9mm holes to weld through, worked great.

 

QvGBgpZ.jpg

 

wvib5aY.jpg

 

7qKmX4w.jpg

 

I'm about half way through knocking up the angle section which caps it all off (along the bottom edge of the windscreen). With any luck I might get a bit of time after work during the week.

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that repair panel is top notch! 
definitely got some natural talent in metal forming. 
good job welding it in too. @Kiwi-E made some good patches very early on in his XE and XF if you haven't seen them, they are pretty inspiring also(calls them birdshit welds, but they are well above my level of acceptable)

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General size of spot weld removal drill bits are 6 or 8mm, personally use the 8mm mostly. Makes it fairly easy task to plug back in with the mig later. For better results in plugs you need a hotter weld with less wire going in because you're putting it all in the one spot. You want the heat to fuse the bottom layer with just enough wire feeding in to fill the plug but not blow through or burn your top edge away as you go. Takes practice but I think you've got it covered

 

Smaller plugs can be done, around the 5-6mm but you need to set it hot, and zap a little on something just before doing the plug to heat the wire up. Always start the plug with the arc on the bottom layer in the center of the hole and work out and around until fully fused. For the small holes like that you can usually get away with nudging the wire speed down a fraction further to make sure the heat gets right into the joint.

 

Edit: especially for the small plugs, clean out the spot before you weld so the base of the hole is clean steel. I use a pointed wire brush on the drill most times. Zinc fouls welds and will make it very difficult to get plugs right... I know it says weld through but they don't mean it like that.

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, deankdx said:

that repair panel is top notch! 
definitely got some natural talent in metal forming. 
good job welding it in too. @Kiwi-E made some good patches very early on in his XE and XF if you haven't seen them, they are pretty inspiring also(calls them birdshit welds, but they are well above my level of acceptable)

 

Cheers for the praise, yeah I'm really happy with it so far. I just wish I had a bending brake now (even just a hand operated bench-top one). Would make folding a 30 second job as opposed to a half hour job.

 

I just read through the XE thread of Kwik-E's and to say "impressive" would be an understatement. The rust repairs he's done on that XE ute in particular are just mammoth. 

 

Heh, bird shit welds, pllleeease! 😂 

 

4 hours ago, 2redrovers said:

General size of spot weld removal drill bits are 6 or 8mm, personally use the 8mm mostly. Makes it fairly easy task to plug back in with the mig later. For better results in plugs you need a hotter weld with less wire going in because you're putting it all in the one spot. You want the heat to fuse the bottom layer with just enough wire feeding in to fill the plug but not blow through or burn your top edge away as you go. Takes practice but I think you've got it coveredemoji41.pngemoji106.png

 

Smaller plugs can be done, around the 5-6mm but you need to set it hot, and zap a little on something just before doing the plug to heat the wire up. Always start the plug with the arc on the bottom layer in the center of the hole and work out and around until fully fused. For the small holes like that you can usually get away with nudging the wire speed down a fraction further to make sure the heat gets right into the joint.

 

Edit: especially for the small plugs, clean out the spot before you weld so the base of the hole is clean steel. I use a pointed wire brush on the drill most times. Zinc fouls welds and will make it very difficult to get plugs right... I know it says weld through but they don't mean it like that.

 

Thanks for the tips! Massively appreciated as usual. Hotter and less wire for those "plugs" makes sense. Thinking back, with the smaller hole it was just feeding a lot of wire and filling the hole, so it makes perfect sense now you say it. Will definitely try that next time 👍

 

I have a heap more plugs to weld, to attach the top "cap" angle section, so I will hopefully finesse it a bit more. Ideally I don't want to try and tidy-up or grind back any of the welds in this particular repaired area - won't be seen and I'm aiming for a neat enough repair that I don't need to grind it back... So hopefully some neater plugs from here... We'll see 😨

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Tonight I just finished off this top section. Reasonably good fit, should be able to finesse it as I weld it into place.

Looks a bit like Swiss cheese at the moment with all the holes (most of which are for welds, three are to bolt in the actual wiper motor assembly).

Pretty damn happy with it though, can’t wait to weld it in. Just sitting in place in the last pic.

PROGRESS.

1edba3fe062e768317ac08777f2d7b35.jpg

46402010e80a2d86ef84d14b1436fcb6.jpg


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