77xcfalcon

Xc crossflow sedan build

81 posts in this topic

I thought I might start fitting panels to make sure everything lined up, put the boot on and could not get it anywhere near nice. Went and swapped it with another one my mate had and it was the same as the first. I had to put a old seal on and it fit perfectly, I was wondering if that is how they come out of the factory or do the boot lids sag after a while?
I’m hoping to put all the panels, bumper, grill and lights on to make sure it’s all going to sit together nicely tomorrow.f60af4853d14e9b45934588831c46ca0.jpg


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The rubber seals do settle a little bit, but, without hours and hours of welding/bog/filing..... they are what they are...40 year old panels made in the Seventies.

Sometimes you just get lucky, sometimes you don't. The purple one looks ok, from here. :)

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Found a extra few days work when i hung all the panels. Twists in bumpers, left hand guard not repaired properly and doesnt match the other side and so on ......
7f1d0feb7b6857472372e1e2b97f0f93.jpg

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Found a extra few days work when i hung all the panels. Twists in bumpers, left hand guard not repaired properly and doesnt match the other side and so on ......
7f1d0feb7b6857472372e1e2b97f0f93.jpg

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Sometimes those die cast moldings on the leading edge of the guards don't line up with the panel very well, might pay to loosen and jiggle them around a bit, elongate holes, massage the guard to suit, whatever it takes. I've never liked how they sit on the car, especially having another panel gap to try and sort.

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I thought this door only had a bit of surface rust and a couple of little holes. I gave it a scrape with a screwdriver and turned up all of this57de01f04d47c2cc1b736136b365a9a4.jpg

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that will need a bit of work(or replacing)

I will definitely have to repair that one, mint ones are way to expensive and cheap ones will probably be just as bad. I might be able to cut some patches from another rooted door to make it easier to fix this one.


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I’ve been thinking about fixing this door, the only thing stopping me is the recessed areas in the bottom of the door. Does anybody know if these are necessary to the door fitting and operating properly or were they just for extra strength?


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34 minutes ago, 77xcfalcon said:

I’ve been thinking about fixing this door, the only thing stopping me is the recessed areas in the bottom of the door. Does anybody know if these are necessary to the door fitting and operating properly or were they just for extra strength?


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@2redrovers has had coupe versions doors apart and may remember if they are needed

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Coupes only have a shaped recess for the bolt that holds the window mechanism, and the shapes near the ends that have the drain holes. I haven't seen a sedan door in person to say if they are required for clearance or to hold a reinforcement inside the shell.

To make those shapes easily make them in stages. Fold an appropriate length to cover the area, slit along the fold at the ends and bend them up to make the shape of the recess, weld up the cuts. Shape is formed add all parts together and soon you've got a doorshell.
Like this...
b1d07066805e993bdf2300f1a9ab89a2.jpg478271b32d673a6f2d64d4abe8a01c9d.jpg

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The shell can be put back together using simple shapes as I said, like the corner in this pic of the coupe door.
b8591f3716b883b00b9034b342d78301.jpg
Be aware that as the outside is as bad as yours, the inner reinforcements for the hinges etc will also be affected by rust
59a8542418d5f4f9472903b0fbad80d3.jpg
I took the skin off the door to repair the heavy gauge steel that had rusted through. Deskinning a door isn't as hard as it seems and worth the effort if its a "forever car" or long term keeper.

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Hey thanks man, I think I will just have a crack and delete the recesses and deal with it if it doesn’t fit, and the internal frame does look a bit like your last pic above, hopefully I’ll be able to sort it without deskinning but if i end up having to I will.



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I can show you another way to hammer up those sorts of shapes when I get to the workshop later. I'd explain it but I doubt it would make sense without pics.

As for whether they are needed, have a look inside the door and check if there's anything spotwelded in those places. If nothing there, chances are its either leftover from earlier tooling (another car model needed the shapes but this didn't) , or just to make the door stiffer. Is there any corresponding bumps on the door jamb or sill in same spots? Doubtful as they are usually flat to seal against.

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I can show you another way to hammer up those sorts of shapes when I get to the workshop later. I'd explain it but I doubt it would make sense without pics.

As for whether they are needed, have a look inside the door and check if there's anything spotwelded in those places. If nothing there, chances are its either leftover from earlier tooling (another car model needed the shapes but this didn't) , or just to make the door stiffer. Is there any corresponding bumps on the door jamb or sill in same spots? Doubtful as they are usually flat to seal against.

Thanks that would be great, any knowledge and tips I can learn will hopefully stop me having to do things two or three times because I end up not happy with the finish. The door flange is flat and the other front door has heaps of clearance so I’m 90% confidant the recesses are for extra strength or like you said to hold the internal frame work.
I only learnt to weld on the farm growing up and working as a form worker so my skills with this thin stuff could be a lot better but the more I do the more confident I am getting. I’m pretty much working with the philosophy of learning by just doing it


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could it be to clear the scuff plates ? that hold the carpet down... i thought they ran full length, but might pay to take a look

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could it be to clear the scuff plates ? that hold the carpet down... i thought they ran full length, but might pay to take a look

Yeah dean I put the scuff plate on the other front door and they didnt line up, one was close but the door won’t close far enough for it to be a drama


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